Awarding child support to a non-custodial parent doesn’t seem to make sense. Why would a parent who has access with his or her children for less time receive child support from the custodial parent?

Well, Kaplan v. Kaplan says exactly that. Kaplan, a case of first impression in Maryland may bring good news to some that child support could flow to the parent who doesn’t have as much access with his or her children.  In the Kaplan case, the Court of Special Appeals upheld a ruling by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County that awarded child support from the primary custodial parent to the other parent.

This case was unique in its fact pattern. First, this case was an ‘above-the-guidelines’ case. Meaning that, the current Maryland child support guidelines are capped for parties with a total gross income of $15,000 per month or $180,000 per year. In an above-the-guidelines case, the court has discretion to promote the objectives of the guidelines and take into consideration the particular facts of the case in order to determine child support.

The father in this case was a high earner — his base salary was over $1 million. The mother earned about $50,000. Even though the father in this case had a rigorous work schedule, the court awarded him primary custody of the children and the mother had visitation. The court also awarded the mother child support, which is atypical. Usually, child support flows to the parent who has more overnights with the child or children.

The court rationalized awarding the mother child support because she incurred expenses for the children when they were with her overnight. And as Maryland law supports, the children are entitled to the same standard of living at both of their parents’ homes and because of the income disparity, the mother in this case was unable to provide the same standard of living commensurate to the father’s if she did not receive child support because of the income difference.  

Some may find this ruling just while others may think it’s unfair. Keep in mind: child support is a benefit for the children. And if you think you may be entitled to a child support adjustment based on the Kaplan case, you should consult your attorney..

For more information, contact Liz at erestephan@lerchearly.com.